Foam mould in process


Mould without any foam



Process Chair 2

24th May 2010

Yet another chair pushing the boundaries of traditional upholstery using the fabric as the mould is by Israli designer Gilli Kuchik from bakery studio.

Using in similar technique to raw edges studio and their Tailored wood series and Studio Hausan's Process chair Kuchik is pushing the boundaries of both the materials and process. Using two kinds of polyurethane they are injected into the fabric to create the form.

Hi-density polyurethane is used
for construction and polyurethane foam for comfort.

What is really interesting about this and the other chairs is that the designers are really pushing the boundaries of production, materials and following the ideal that process dictates form.

Tailored Wood, Capellini


Volume Chair


Tailored stool


Tailored wood

11th May 2010

There seems to be a new trend for the use of expandable foam and chairs at the moment which is really interesting as process really does begin to dictate form.

Raw edges studio showed their latest product for capellini in Milan last month, but this is a technique that they have been using for a while now.

Starting with their Tailored stool and volume chair they adopted a technique normally more commonly used in the fashion industry. By generating a paper pattern of a chair they then filled the void with expandable foam. The process is unconventional in the furniture industry as it proposes a construction without the use of a mould.

What is really interesting about this process is that in a sense it is the reversal of upholstery which is usually the skin applied over the form.

For their production for Capellini they have used wood laminate and filled it with expandable foam that has creased and stretched the wood making each piece unique.




Process Chair

11th May 2010

Another chair made without the use of a mould is the Textile moulded chair from Studio Hausen which was shown during Milan Satellite.

Developed from a graduation project the textile form has been refined to create an even spread of foam which is injected into the form to create the chair itself. Again using expandable foam the form has a valve into which the foam is sprayed and spreads evenly around the textile mould. Once it hardens it forms the basis of the chair itself.

This is another great example of where process is dictating form as the structural pattern of the form has been used as it is the most efficient in order for the foam to travel and harden equally.

'Cocoon Plan Sofa'. Designer: Rock Wang, Craft Artist: Tsun-jen Lee


'Brick Plan Tray'. Designer: Rock Wang, Craft Artist: Pei-ze Chen


'Lace Bowls'. Designer: Ching-ting Hsu, Craft Artist: Tsun-jen Lee


Experimental East

10th May 2010

Another highlight from Milan was the exquisite exhibition titled 'Yii" which means 'change and transformation' in Taiwanese philosophy.

Fifteen designers worked with master craftsmen to create a series of beautiful contemporary objects with a traditional blend of sensibilities from artisans and designers from Taiwan.

Each of the designs were inspired by three themes - Nature, cultivation and sustainability and the results offered up some really unusual material choices such as a bamboo woven chair by designer Rock Wang and Craft Artist Tsun-jen Lee which combined the natural process of cocooning silkworms to create a sleek sofa.

Lace porcelain bowls and plates were so delicate from designer Ching-ting Hsu and Craft Artist Tsun-jen Lee. Whilst a tray, vase and bowl made from brick from designer Rock Wang and Craft Artist Pei-ze Chen brings a whole new perception of the beauty of such an mundane building material.









L'Artisan Electronique

5th May 2010

There were lots of great things showcased during Milan, but the one thing that I keep finding myself telling people about the most or referring to as a key trend driver from a technological and artisan perspective is the L'artisan Electronique by Unfold + Tim Knapen.

Showing what is possible with live computer aided design and rapid prototyping they created a miniature clay pot that was rapid prototyped using clay that was sculpted and conformed by people moving their hands in the air working with lasers and projectors.

By enabling people to sculpt and form simply by shaping their hands in the air looks to revolutionise craft and digital manufacturing and essentially the potter and his wheel.


About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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