101.86°- color of the day

19th September 2015

Two of my favourite designers Thomas Vailly and Laura Lynn Jansen's latest project that was shown at Maison et Object explores colour and the way that we can experience light.

An evolution of the work shown during Dutch Invertuals in Milan, they have used a material that possesses crystalline qualities that are usually only found in natural materials and in nature.

By combining nature and technology the resulting time pieces play with our appreciation of light showing numerous optical layers of unique colour patterns that are always unique and dazzling.



Digital Nature

10th September 2015

Nature and technology are often seen as separate but increasingly we are seeing designers and technologists exploring the boundary between.

TeamLab a Japanese technology collective have created an immersive exhibition that invites visitors to engage with a digital eco system of flowers and butterflies, digitally created to blossom, wither and die exploring the cycle of nature through a digital medium.

The installation will be on display at the Saatchi Gallery from 10 to 13 September





How technology becomes nature

15th October 2014

Exploring theories around when technology becomes nature in 7 steps, artist, philosopher and thought provoker Dr Koert van Memsvoort outlines how as our technological environment becomes more complex and omnipresent it is becoming our next nature.

In an enlightening talk as part of the TEDx series he likens Maslows hierarchy of needs to his own pyramid of naturalisation as technology becomes nature in seven steps.

Exploring the naturalisation of technology from stone axes to mobile phones Memsvoort demonstrates how technology becomes something we take for granted and in many cases become heavily reliant on. With the ongoing debate around the need and desire for wearables as well as the advancement of artificial intelligence to a time of singularity - a time whereby non human intelligence will exceed human intelligence for the first time it is interesting to step back and look at how technology in all its forms has shaped us and how we are relatively unaware of how new technologies are introduced, accepted and discarded by our society.

Rather than being scared of technology, its about embracing it and recognising that technology is omnipresent and not only something that has been invented since we were born. Technology is the foundation of man and is inherent to our evolution.




The Next Black

21st May 2014

With the world of fashion in flux about issues surrounding sustainability, wearable electronics and future consumption, AEG have commissioned a beautiful and thought provoking film exploring where the future of fashion sits at the intersection of technology, biology and sustainability.

Titled The Next Black the films thoughtful approach talks to pioneers in this field to include Nancy Tilbury at Studio XO, Suzanne Lee who pioneered bioCouture as well as Patagonia and Adidas.

As well as more well known innovators in this area they also introduce us to a waterless dyeing technique that uses 50% less energy and 50% less water than current widely used dyeing processes.

Using super critical carbon dioxide to dye the fabrics, Sophie Mather from YEH explains the impact that dyeing textiles has on our environment and the impact that fast fashion has had on the tonnes of textiles made and dyed each year. Contextualising the enormity of the impact of the hidden side of fashion, Mather along with the others in the film eloquently puts the future impact of fashion into reality.

As the narrator highlights in the film, which future will reign supreme in the fashion world, be it tech or biology or simply the consumer taking a more caring role in consuming less is unknown, but what is known is that something certainly does have to change.





Fly Factory

7th May 2014

Inspired by the 2013 report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations called Edible Insects, which investigates how eating insects could help future food shortages, design graduate Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson has created a Fly Factory that breeds insect larvae for human consumption.

Echoing the spider factory from Thomas Maincent in its aesthetic Aðalsteinsson's fly factory uses larvae bred in the factory to create pate and dessert.

The conceptual micro-factory utilises food waste as the feed for the insects reducing issues surrounding food waste whilst creating a new protein solution which according to Aðalsteinsson tastes like chicken.

Experimenting with the flavours and foodstuff he has also created a series of recipes such as coconut-chocolate larvae dessert. His designs are not expected to be for the home, rather for restaurants and industrial use but the debate still goes on to whether the western palette will except eating bugs and insects.

Aðalsteinsson is not the first designer to explore this area and is one of a growing number of designers and nutritionists who recognise the importance of finding an alternative source of protein for future diets.




About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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101.86°- color of the day

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places I go for inspiration


Next Nature
Designindaba
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WIDN
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designboom
Textile Futures Research Group
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materials library
TodayandTomorrow
highlowtech
thecoolhunter
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