Wishful thinking, Wishful doing

2nd December 2014

“Substitute what causes harm” is the mantra from Studio Tjeerd Veenhoven.

One of the pioneers of the nature trend that is growing momentum, Tjeerd Veenhoven is interested in the process equally to the outcome which has resulted in the studio creating and exploring ecological projects that express the beautiful journey from concept to implementation.

Known for their palm leather project their pursuit of the alternative resulted in a stunning exhibit 'Wishful thinking, Wishful doing' during Dutch Design week.

One of the projects on show and in its infancy and yet to be named takes the waste tulip heads that are cut off the bulbs - one of Hollands most famous exports.

Extracting pigments from the heads they have found a pigment that has properties that aren't found in synthetic alternatives. Initially they planned to use them as an alternative to synthetic inks for printing on bio-plastic bags to make them truly biodegradable, but according to the studio the possibilities of the pigments are endless.

Alongside this an array of projects hint at how nature is being re invigorated into design with beautiful outcomes with stunning colour inspiration. Similarly to the Algaemy project and the Colour Provenance as well as Urtica Nettle Fabrics we are seeing a return to nature for its beautiful pigments.








Seen

18th November 2014

Retro reflective clothing for cycling is not in itself new, we have over the years seen numerous designers trying to bridge the gap between safety and style, but the latest offering from Dutch Design Academy graduate Marlies Schets woven fabrics are subtle and beautiful in their own right.

In natural day light the fabrics look and feel sumptuous but at night under direct light they reflect. Titled SEEN the collection is a series of fabrics and products such as scarves, a back pack and bike lock which are made from her woven fabrics.








S pot

13th November 2014

Looking with a nostalgic view to the past before central heating, a time when families huddled around the fire to keep warm and to have convivial evenings, Maddalena Selvini has designed a set of pots and object that can be piled together on the same fire for cooking or warming up.

Also driven by issues surrounding rising fuel costs and wasted heat from central heating that heats rooms that are empty, she has created a series of pots and warming stones to warm food, people and the home. Using a soapstone called “Pietra Ollare”, which is from Valtellina, Italy, each piece is handmade according to an old craft that is slowly being forgotten.

She chose this stone because of its ability to keep warm for long periods of time and because it is a great material to cook with due to its natural lubrication. Wasting nothing she also used the sand left over from the lathe to create a new kind of stoneware and glaze.









Recrystallising the Desert

12th November 2014

Designer Erez Navi Pana always explores new ways of working with unexpected materials such as his baked earth furniture.

In his latest project he explores how salt waste from a Dead Sea works factory could be used as a resourceful material rather than a bi product that is causing ecological damage to surrounding areas.

By conceiving a manufacturing process using the salt and solar energy he proposes to make waste salt desirable again, perhaps in his words, 'marble for the poor'.

His 'Recrystallising the Desert' project examines the development of a production method with NaCl as the main substance in salt. Through heating and layering, a solid mass of pure salt can be created suggesting the production of basic salt tiles.

He has also designed a way of melting the salt with solar energy and a parabolic mirror that can be used to concentrate the sun rays.

The resulting salt tiles are not naturally waterproof so he proposes to solve this by combing the salt with dead sea clay powder which when fired creates a glaze and an ultimately water resistant tile.








Post Modern

11th November 2014

I first saw Nynke Kosters work in Milan during design week as few years ago as part of her graduation project and since then she has continued to collect more elements of buildings and decorative frescos.

Casting decorative architectural carvings and historical patterns she captures history in a modern material.

Placed in new contexts and cast in rubber and latex she has created furniture pieces that play with our perceptions of scale, materiality and value.

Her latest collection that was shown during Dutch Design week titled 'Elements of Time' makes up her stool collection and over the coming months she hopes to capture history in a 30 stool collection that will be placed in a time line showing changes in decoration over the historical periods.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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