Periodic Elements

21st April 2015

The brilliant materials stylist Abby Bucknall who writes and styles for Something about Magazine Form Section has recently styled the periodic elements using great materials and photography.

Working in collaboration with Hannah Jordan and photographer Will Thom they have captured fire, water, wind, ice and earth in striking visuals that are inspiring for colour and material.








Time over Time

19th April 2015

Exhibiting as part of a new collective allthingsinbetween during Milan design week Dawn Haleta continues to explore with light as a medium with which to design with and explore narrative of time.

Her work titled Time Over Time considers material decomposition or changes in surface qualities that act as a signifier of the passing of time.

Each of her lights that appear like otherworldly crystals are cast in dichroic glass and slowly change colour during the day from morning to midday to midnight using alternating light waves.

Titled Chip, VanDeventer, Arrow, Stack, Asteroid, Pinnacle and MachuPichu each of the lights are designed to represent shadows, light interplay and planetary light phenomenon.

Representing time, the slowly changing properties in each dynamic relic embody a past and a future in which the passing of time is communicated through alterations in light and color. Time Over Time recognizes our instinctive ability to note the subtle changes around us as a method of tracking the passage of time.












Wishful thinking, Wishful doing

2nd December 2014

“Substitute what causes harm” is the mantra from Studio Tjeerd Veenhoven.

One of the pioneers of the nature trend that is growing momentum, Tjeerd Veenhoven is interested in the process equally to the outcome which has resulted in the studio creating and exploring ecological projects that express the beautiful journey from concept to implementation.

Known for their palm leather project their pursuit of the alternative resulted in a stunning exhibit 'Wishful thinking, Wishful doing' during Dutch Design week.

One of the projects on show and in its infancy and yet to be named takes the waste tulip heads that are cut off the bulbs - one of Hollands most famous exports.

Extracting pigments from the heads they have found a pigment that has properties that aren't found in synthetic alternatives. Initially they planned to use them as an alternative to synthetic inks for printing on bio-plastic bags to make them truly biodegradable, but according to the studio the possibilities of the pigments are endless.

Alongside this an array of projects hint at how nature is being re invigorated into design with beautiful outcomes with stunning colour inspiration. Similarly to the Algaemy project and the Colour Provenance as well as Urtica Nettle Fabrics we are seeing a return to nature for its beautiful pigments.




Synesthesia

1st December 2014

Synesthesia is a fascinating condition that affects the way that people see, taste, experience and engage with things around them leading people to hear colours or taste numbers.

Arising from mixed up brain signals it opens up another layer of experience in the way that we engage with stimuli and something that is of real interest in the way that we experience and engage with colour.

As part of my Practitioner in Residence at Chelsea I ran a series of colour workshops asking the students to open up their minds to 'The taste of colour, the smell of colour, the touch of colour: A workshop to explore how colour is not just a visual sense'.

The results were a much more thoughtful approach to colour which were captured in a series of colour studies, but what is more interesting is that a group of scientists at the University of Sussex think that it is actually possible to teach synesthesia.

The results were temporary, but it appears that the brain can perhaps be re conditioned to experiencing on different levels and therefore letting us into the wonderful world of synesthesia.

[youtube]youtu.be/Dc60ldmTrIg[/youtube]








Electro Colour

26th November 2014

Celebrating the hidden beauty in electronic products, designer Cindy Strobach uses electricity and the electrolysis of red cabbage juice to print colour and pattern.

Her Electro Colour products which were shown as part of her graduation from the Royal College of Art earlier this year expose the circuitry of daily objects such as a toaster and a lamp.

Staining ceramics with juice results in a trace along the electrical wires creating a beautiful almost x ray like image.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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