Hybrid Holism

31st July 2012

I wasn't as impressed as in previous seasons when I first saw Iris Van Herpen's latest collection - simply because we have almost seen it all before, but then I discovered that she was inspired by Philip Beesly's living architecture and I took another look.

Beesleys work is amazing on every level and so beautiful and I can see the aesthetic links.

Showing his latest work in the exhibition ‘Mobile Forest’ in Taipei's digital arts centre till august 5th he has created an immersive film showcasing images from his amazing Hylozoic series of works. Viewers stand amongst projectors whilst listening to a minimalist soundtrack.












Frozen fabric

18th July 2012

Another example showcasing a moulding process, Jungin Lee, a recent graduate from design products at the RCA creates flexible plastic sheets that look like frozen fabric.

Lee has developed a unique process using a thin layer of jesmonite and fibreglass over the top of a screen printed pattern.

Screen printing onto a plastic sheet, Lee then coats it with a unique recipe and whilst the coated plastic is drying it can be formed into shape. When dry the plastic sheet is removed leaving the screen printed pattern transferred onto the fibreglass and with the appearance of a fabric that is frozen or captured in time.




Makos Ioannides


Makos Ioannides


Makos Ioannides


Dafi Reis Doron


Dafi Reis Doron


Dafi Reis Doron


Explandable Foam

17th July 2012

I have always had a fascination and mild love for expandable foam so I was delighted to see Makos Ioannides' work at New Designers part 2.

A series of open source furniture, his pieces explore fun and adventure with a sense of curiosity. Requiring board material, packing tape, nails and expandable foam the outcome is completely up to each individual 'designer maker' as he calls them.

In a similar vein the work of Dafi Reis Doron, a recent graduate from the RCA explores polyurethane industrial manufacturing processes. She has developed a process of creating furniture that 'grows' a tactile surface that has a fabric look and feel, whilst also being the mechanics of the piece.

Using the material that is usually hidden, she has poured the foam into the wooden structure and let it expand. The use of an open mould allows the organic shape to be part of the design and the foam the mechanics for the comfort and molding to the user in the chair.











Nacre

4th July 2012

One of my favourtie designers at the moment is Emile De Visscher who explores the boundaries of materials in entirely new ways. HIs latest project that was shown for his graduation project at the RCA explores issues of mass consumption and the notion that we have little time to actually appreciate what is in front of us.

Exploring the boundaries between science and engineering and bio mimicry, scientific nature and synthetic biology he has created a man made nacre - the material that pearls are made from.

A material that is revered for its beauty and rarity, it is also extremely strong, whilst being very lightweight. Applying the technology to a series of unexpected objects it can harden fragile objects or beautify the mundane.

Exploring the notions of slow design in a world where we have a thirst for everything instantaneously, De Visscher questions whether the slowness of mimicking nacre makes it more valuable in itself. Developing a machine that one watches the process unfurl adds to the attachment to the resulting object that has been coated.

Questioning the process De Visscher wonders:
[i']...do artificial pearls have the same value as real pearls? Does value come from the material properties? From availability? From the time it takes to make them? From the oyster? Pearls are not limited in shape anymore. With the help of science, we can now create new shapes and uses?' [/i]







Light emitting plastic

4th July 2012

First we had self healing plastic and now scientists at the University of Technology Eindhoven (TU/e) in Holland have created a plastic that emits light.

When the plastic is pulled an additional element added to the plastic molecules (called dioxetane) breaks open and emits red, blue or yellow light. Once released from the tensile stretch the light stops.

Currently the researchers are not sure of the uses of such a technology, but they do see it as useful in being able to study very accurately how polymers break with the addition of the light and therefore opens up some new possibilities to plastic research, but I am sure there are ample fantastic uses just waiting to surface once designers get their hands on such a technology.



About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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