Future Forward Fashion

31st January 2012

Having been making a name for herself as a socially responsible fashion designer through projects she has undertaken to include burying fabric to naturally age it rather than use chemicals and to train marginalized groups in fashion, Sakina M’sa is an interesting designer to watch.

Having collaborated with Puma and Merci (Paris) last year for a range of 100 pieces made from recycled french work clothes, her latest couture collection shows off her love of bold colour as well as graphically striking shapes - and of course includes her preferred shade of blue.

Patchworked in very modern ways and with mixed materials, inverted triangles stand out from the body in almost 3D future forward shapes and make for a striking collection.









A plastic future

30th January 2012

With the continuing discussions about us running out of fossil fuels (which apparently is never going to happen according to those in the know) and the ongoing debate about plastic and its negative side, textile designer Ana Quaresma is asking the question “What is the future of plastic in a post-oil era?”

Part a consideration of sustainability, part an education, her project as part of her masters at Central St Martins Textile futures shines a light on our dependence on plastics and the importance of it as a material in our lives.

What is interesting about her project is that she is actually ambivalent towards plastic, but believes that our real understanding of the positive and the negatives of the material need to be explored.

In her project she celebrates plastic and finds a new beauty in it by weaving by hand a fabric that almost looks like molten gold - and in essence takes on a new ideal of beauty and importance. She also depicts the life of plastic and unpacks the 'truth' about the low carbon foot print plastic has rather than the perception of it being truly bad for the environment.

Her belief is that humans perceive quality and importance by the way something ages through time, but the beauty of plastic is that it can be designed to decay or look aged. She also believes that if we look at plastic in its use outside of the much talked about 'plastic bag' we will begin again to see its fundamental wealth in medicine and technology by citing key examples of where it is better than the alternative.

Her project by nature is contentious but it is truly relevant and one that will bring an interesting topic of discussion to the table. Her parting shot about her project is that “By giving it (plastic) time it becomes precious… In the past we wove with gold, in the new tomorrow with plastic filaments.”

Alexander McQueen


Frankie Morello


Frankie Morello


Frankie Morello


Issey Miyake


Sartorial D-égradé

30th January 2012

Textiles are always hugely important in menswear as the silhouette changes less dramatically from season to season than it does for womenswear, but I am particularly pleased to see the woven dégradé at Issey Miyake, Frankie Morello and Alexander McQueen. Bringing texture and dimension they update sartorial fabrics with a fresh and directional edge.







Microscopic Couture

26th January 2012

Firm favorite, Iris Van Herpen's spring summer 12 couture collection was yet again beautiful, other worldly and pushing the boundaries of materiality, form and of course function.

Skeletal constructions abound in plasticized fabrics that appear molten, as well as her trademark rapid prototyped pieces. Inspired by nature (as her work so often is) she looked at Microscopic organisms as if seen under the microscope.

Her materials explore form and function using leather, synthetic boat rigging and pexiglass to name a few and she has collaborated with the brilliant Bart Hess who's latest work STRP mutant - a video installation piece - bears a striking resemblance to one of the pieces in Van Herpen's collection having been translated from digital to physical.










Recycling the dead

17th January 2012

Titled 'Salvage: Recycling the dead' Woven textile designer Kerry Greville unveiled her masters project during the CSM Textile futures work in progress show.

One of my favourite projects from the first tutorial I had with the students I think her provocational project really puts into perspective our depleting resources that we are 'mining' from the world.

Suggesting a future whereby we may well utilise the precious materials to be found in humans after cremation, Kerry has designed a series of imaginary products that incorporate minerals sourced from human ashes.

With the potential of a Phd, this project is simply at this stage about bringing an awareness to the potential and Kerry is not saying whether this is right or wrong, but questions how we would feel about a product or material if it had recently been human.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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