Peter Marigold


Peter Marigold


Peter Marigold


Study O Portable


Hunting and Narud


Hunting and Narud


Oyuna: Soft Edge

18th September 2014

Taking their design signature from product and speculative design to textiles, some of my favourite designers Peter Marigold and Study O Portable as well as Hunting and Narud have curated their stories onto cashmere for Cashmere brand Oyuna.

Telling stories about the origins of cashmere and incorporating his signature design, Peter Marigold has used the beauty of rust markings to create patterns that represent the passing of time whilst Study O Portable were inspired by the fact that during the second world war many countries banned the production of knitted jumpers because spies were using the patterns to embed code.

Looking to code of today they have designed a knitted textile that incorporates a code displayed through colour and pattern. Titled Echoes, they designed a code using 1's and 0's for each stitch which was sent to a Mongolian programmer to translate into real fabric.

Taking a more info graphic approach to telling the story of cashmere production Amy Hunting and Oscar Narud's piece is a black and white chequered fabric that acts as a time piece representing the number of hairs a Mongolian cashmere goat produces each year, month and day.

The point of these pieces is to draw attention to something that we take for granted and use every day and the history behind cashmere.









Flat Fashion

10th September 2014

With the onslaught of womenswear during New York Fashion Week and more to come from London, Paris and Milan this project is a breath of fresh air.

A clothing collection based on the archetypal silhouette and fabric of traditional menswear designer Camiel Fortgens a graduate from Design Academy Eindhoven explores a "cut copy paste" approach.

Detaching from a world over saturated by trends that come and go and challenging the contemporary culture of 'copy and paste' she has created a series of odd, flat, yet recognisable pieces that push the boundaries of both fashion and menswear.

Working with archetypal pieces - a t shirt, jeans, coat and shirt she has used stiff materials that enhance the forms that appear to float around the body rather than contour and fit.






Dimensional Floral Fashion

10th September 2014

Caroline Herrera showcased a modern collection in New York this fashion week that plays with perceptions of real and fake, digital and hand drawn and a collection that was inspired by the colour code of a flower.

Saturated graphics of pixelated florals punctuated the white back drop and added to the optical illusion of 3D flowers.







Primitive Fashion

9th September 2014

Primitive is a key word at the moment for future trends and one that fashion designer Alex Mullins has embraced in a beautifully modern and imperfect way.

Alex has always explored textiles and tactility in an exuberant way and is his signature and his latest SS15 collection continues this DNA.

Taking inspiration from a primitive ideology of how to dress, Alex has designed the collection for a fictitious Native American Motorcycle gang.

His textile explorations are inspired by how he imagines they would create and re purpose their own materials from the resources around them.

Based in America in the 1970's this SS15 collection demonstrates a beautiful textural and sensitively coloured collection.






Natures Time

8th September 2014

Time, nature and their relationship has been a hot topic for design and is one that is clearly not going away.

The latest foray into re appropriating time in a and more emotional way is in the form of Bril's Coniferous clock that is filled with leaves that take a year to die.

The leaves in the clock slowly fade from green to brown over the course of a year creating an annual clock that exists without hands or numbers.

Inspired by the traditional Japanese sugidama - which is used to signify when Sake is ready to drink after pressing - consisting of fresh cedar tree branches being tied together at harvest. When the leaves turn brown it indicated that the Sake is ready to drink.

Extending the time to encompass 365 days this modern take clock slowly fades from green to brown and is entirely compostable at the end of its life.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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