Primitive Fashion

9th September 2014

Primitive is a key word at the moment for future trends and one that fashion designer Alex Mullins has embraced in a beautifully modern and imperfect way.

Alex has always explored textiles and tactility in an exuberant way and is his signature and his latest SS15 collection continues this DNA.

Taking inspiration from a primitive ideology of how to dress, Alex has designed the collection for a fictitious Native American Motorcycle gang.

His textile explorations are inspired by how he imagines they would create and re purpose their own materials from the resources around them.

Based in America in the 1970's this SS15 collection demonstrates a beautiful textural and sensitively coloured collection.






Natures Time

8th September 2014

Time, nature and their relationship has been a hot topic for design and is one that is clearly not going away.

The latest foray into re appropriating time in a and more emotional way is in the form of Bril's Coniferous clock that is filled with leaves that take a year to die.

The leaves in the clock slowly fade from green to brown over the course of a year creating an annual clock that exists without hands or numbers.

Inspired by the traditional Japanese sugidama - which is used to signify when Sake is ready to drink after pressing - consisting of fresh cedar tree branches being tied together at harvest. When the leaves turn brown it indicated that the Sake is ready to drink.

Extending the time to encompass 365 days this modern take clock slowly fades from green to brown and is entirely compostable at the end of its life.









MonoBloc Brushes

1st September 2014

Exploring how to design a well known object with a mono material has driven design duo AndreyAndShay to re design the humble brush.

Looking at how brushes are made today - with machinery making a simple and beautiful process cumbersome and inefficient they considered how the processes could somehow be combined and created from a mono material and in fewer steps.

The final outcome is a series of three brushes whereby the bristles themselves become the handle made from single pieces of plastic.

Using a mould with is part heat conducting and part heat insulating they can control the polypropylene bristles to take on the shape of the handle. The designs themselves have been inspired by traditional straw brushes and make up a collection of 3 functional yet beautiful and simple objects.











Metallic Geology

8th August 2014

A firm favourite of mine Studio Swine's latest project is beautiful, tactile and pushing the boundaries of materiality.

Looking like volcanic rock and in keeping with the primitive and geological trend in materials and design that is not abating (think Forma Fantasma) these cabinets at first glance look like volcanic or pumice stone, but in fact are made from aluminium foam.

Inspired to use the material that is usually used for sound insulation and car interiors, the design duo loved the industrial man made aesthetic that the material has and how it mimics nature.

What is really interesting about this material is how light weight it is as it is mostly made up of air so our perceptions of materials and reality are thrown on their head.

And in keeping with their sustainable considerations that under pin all the projects carried out by Studio Swine, this project is a comment on the future of aluminium mining which according to scientists and economists will potential come to an end in the coming decade thanks to the potential of recycled material being able to supply the needs of the industry.




Beautiful brain

5th August 2014

Exploring the untapped recesses of the brain is a hot subject for both design and technology at the moment, as I have already written about on Unique Style Platform, the brain is a new tool for design, but more than that it is a resource of wonder, experience and communication.

The latest designer to explore the brain is Lauren Bowker and The Unseen in collaboration with Swarovski.

Designing a gemstone-encrusted headdress using phase change inks and over 40,000 specially grown stones it changes colour in response to varying energy levels in the brain.

According to Bowker the headpiece works on everyone with excitement and nerves producing different colours and patterns and they have already noticed that different times of the day affect the brightness and intensity of the colours.

The headdress will be shown during London Design Festival in September.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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