Dragonstone

9th April 2014

Also showing as part of Dutch Invertuals:Happy Future was the latest evolution of work from Jolan van der Wiel.

Considering the fact that throughout history what human kind thought they knew has been refuted thanks for technological advancement - for instance that the world was flat or that we were the centre of the universe - our world is changing at such a pace that although we have a lot of knowledge, perhaps even the things we take as fact are perhaps not what they seem.

“When our own worldviews collapse, the answers for a future might be found in the irrational, the unworldly or the mystery.”

Questioning whether our current physical laws might just be another misconception, Jolan's Dragonstone project explores a new kind of mystery.

Utilising his trademark ferrous material he has created beautiful unearthly pieces that defy gravity and form. In his words:

‘Dragonstone’ proclaims mystery; the objects seem to be a part of the imaginative, islands of something unearthly. Through playing with the forces of magnetism and gravity and overruling the conventional, ‘Dragonstone’ presents us a contemporary dilemma: do we want to keep with our traditional logic or do we follow these objects towards an intriguing new story?





Smog Ring

3rd April 2014

The brilliant Daan Rooesgarde who has already brought us light up highways, glowing trees as replacement for street lamps, opacity changing modesty dresses and anti smog parks in Beijing has unveiled his latest project - a luxury ring that is a bi product of his fight against urban pollution.

Still in its design phase, the ring will be a metal band housing a clear central stone that will house smog particles that have been extracted from Beijing city air in the smog parks themselves.

The black dust, which is made up mostly of carbon soot from coal will symbolise a cubic kilometer of smog that each ring has cleared from the skies.

In addition he wants to develop a higher end version whereby he presses the dirty air particles and turns them into a valuable stone that resembles a diamond.

Playing with notions of luxury and tackling an issue head on this project is both poetic and practical.

















De Natura Fossilium

2nd April 2014

"Mount Etna is a mine without miners – it is excavating itself to expose its raw materials."

Having been tantalised by their volcano project for a few months now Studio Forma Fantasma, in collaboration with the brilliant Gallery Libby Sellers are unveiling their De Natura Fossilium collection during Milan design week next week.

An investigation into the culture of lava in the Mount Etna and Stromboli regions of Sicily, two of the last active volcanoes in Europe, Studio Forma Fantasma have been exploring the material possibilities from the volcanoes themselves.

Gathering stone as well as using re melted lava to produce glass that has then been mouth blown they have created a series of beautiful objects.

In addition they have also investigated volcanic fibres that have been woven into two wall hangings that depict the Greek mythological gods of Mount Etna and the microscopic views of the volcanic rocks geological strata.







Woven Song

1st April 2014

The brilliant Studio Glithero are to show their latest project in Milan next week incorporating an organ music book re purposed into punch cards for a jacquard.

Commissioned by the Zuiderzee Museum in the Netherlands
they have taken influence from two different industries to bring them together with a new design narrative.

Taking the music code from the organ book, Glithero have translated it directly to a punch card for a traditional jacquard loom which then translates the design into the woven fabric.

When played in an organ the holes denote a note and on the jacquard hooks fall through the holes creating the pattern.

Working with weaver Wil van den Broek and master organ maker Leon van Leeuwen to produce the fabrics the chosen colours reference the craftsmen's workshops.







Impasto

26th March 2014

Danish designer Nikolaj Steenfatt is another designer who is exploring material before form. His IMPASTO project is a self invented biodegradable natural fibre composite made from leftover wood and coffee.

Mixing the raw materials together he treats the material like a dough which is then pressed and rolled into flat sheets. Added pigments mix up to create an organic and fluid aesthetic.

The sheets can be vacuum formed to create shapes such as demonstrated with his chairs and lamps

Similarly to lots of young designers, Nikolaj was driven by sustainable materials research to find a biodegradable material that was easy to work with and scalable to an industrial level.

The outcome is both beautiful and sustainable and imperfection adds a uniqueness to each product which is important in the push back against the homogeny of technology.


About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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