Loom Divide

22nd April 2014

Being a weaver once upon a time I was really taken by this Loom Divide, but was even more delighted by it when I realised it was designed by my friends Ruben and Golnar at RiveRoshan.

Shown during Milan design week as part of the Form and Seek collective at Ventura Lambrate their Loom Divide is a room divider based on the tradition of hand loom weaving.

Utilising what would be the warp and weft, the screen is made up of threads held on tension that can be interchanged to create different levels of visibility and a beautiful colour interplay.

They have used English bakers twine which gives the screen a delicate moiré effect diffusing the visibility but not blocking light. The design also utilises the tension of the threads for its construction with no glue or screws being used and allowing for woven hinge constructions.






Solid Patterns

17th April 2014

The lust for marble was still much in evidence in Milan last week, but by far the most alluring and interesting was shown at Rossana Orlandi by Scholten & Baijings.

Known for their geometric patterning and use of neon colours it was refreshing to see they had carried their design DNA through so clearly onto marble tables.

The Solid Patterns series was for Italian marble producer Luce di Carrara and they used different types of marble from the company's quarry in Tuscany to create 5 different pieces.

Adding their infamous grid patterns to the organic nature of the marble and the contrasting irregular rounded table tops with more geometric bases resulted in a very contemporary aesthetic.









Ephemeral Steam

15th April 2014

Confirming her place as one of my favourite designers, Jetske Visser's work always surprises me with her simple yet thoughtful approach to design and colour.

Her latest project shown during Dutch Invertuals Happy Future explores how steam gave rise to an industrial revolution and the impact it had on the textile industry as it became a method by which to fix dye.

Working with TextielMuseum & TextielLab and Mirte Engelhard Jetske has explored an enchanting and delicate approach to pattern and design through fixing of her fabrics. What is particularly lovely about her fabric pieces and garments is the ephemeral patterns and shapes that are left as almost traces rather than pre determined pattern.









Marmoreal

14th April 2014

Meaning ‘real marble’ or one that resembles marble, 'Marmoreal' was one of the highlights of Milan Design week. A project by Max Lamb for Dzek it showcased Max's ability to work with stone in such a modern and delightful way.

The Marmoreal collection including a table, chair, and shelves made entirely of bespeckled engineered marble was styled to create an illusionary space with a color palette that was sublime.

Engineered from 95 per cent marble and 5 per cent polyester resin binders for a stronger, less porous and more durable stone this project exemplifies the balance between tradition and modernity and continues the exploration of Max's work with craftsmanship, stone and modernity.










CaCO3: Happy Future

9th April 2014

Today in Milan I was bowled over by the fantastic, thoughtful and poetic project from Thomas Vailly and Laura Lynn Jansen showing during Dutch Invertuals as part of their Happy Future exhibition.

Happy Future explores our newly gained knowledge with regard to technology and nature that allows designers and engineers to probe further into the future, exploring a new design language, new design narratives as well as create a future nature.

Working under this umbrella the CaCO3 project from Thomas and Laura epitomises this entirely.

Working with geologists, scientists and craftsmen they have explored new ways of manufacturing and creating stone objects. Rather than extracting stone from the earth and carving it to create new forms, they are taking an additive approach letting nature and man together form and create stone forms.

Using the petrification process of laying down calcified stone, they have created 3D printed structures which are then left in rivers and streams to form similarly to a stalactite over time.

What is particularly intriguing about this project is that they have been able to create different coloured stone from different rivers and have also created almost velvet like surfaces where soft crystals appear.

Working over the course of one year they have created these new fossils that sit somewhere between nature and technology.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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Loom Divide

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CaCO3: Happy Future



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