Algae/Bacteria 1: Material of the Month

27th February 2015

Teresa van Dongen is one of a series of designers who is exploring nature and science to create sustainable products.

Using octopus bacteria she has created a lamp that glows blue when it is given a gentle push.

Driven by the desire for a sustainable lamp and her interest in both design and biology, the resulting Ambio lamp balances two weights and a glass tube that is filled with artificial seawater and luminescent bacteria.

By pushing the lamp gently oxygen mixes with the water and the bacteria glow brightly replicating the natural phenomena of bioluminescent waves in nature.




Something about Form

26th February 2015

A new digital magazine that blurs the boundaries between blogging and traditional magazine publication has launched and celebrates young creatives in the area of styling, fashion, product and luxury.

Titled Somethingaboutmagazine it is divided into 10 sections with a mix of styling, interviews, streams of consciousness and product placement (shame!).

Somethingaboutform focuses on innovation and materials is curated and written by Abby Bucknall, a recent graduate from Central St Martins who has a passion for haptic materials, an eye for textures and cut her teeth into the world of trends as my intern.

Her visuals are beautifully styled and her curious eye leads to an inspiring read.

Matilda Beckman


Matilda Beckman


Ágústa Sveinsdóttir


Ágústa Sveinsdóttir


Ágústa Sveinsdóttir


Anti Materials

24th February 2015

We are running out of natural resources and yet we continue to consume which is pushing designers to find other resources for materials.

Dust as a raw material is gaining interest from a series of designers such as Lucy Libotte who collected dust from peoples homes to use as a glaze for her ceramics, to Matilda Beckman also uses it for her furniture pieces.

Collecting the dust from vintage clothing stores and then mixing it with adhesives she polishes it to resemble a modern day, man made marble.

Also exploring the beauty to be found in dust is jewellery designer Ágústa Sveinsdóttir who sees the re working of dust as a precious material of the future.

Made up of dead skin, hair and precious metal particles, dust is a remarkable material.

Posing questions as to whether we can make something that appears worthless valuable, these projects push the boundaries of our perceptions of anti materials and their potential uses in a materials future that continues to look to unexpected places for inspiration and virgin resources.

Fernando Laposse Madero


Wael Saeiby


Marlene Huissoud


Lucy Libotte


Design Council Ones to Watch

8th February 2015

The Design Council have announced the 70 designers who they think will impact future British design.

Chosen from hundreds of designers, the final 70 are chosen for their outstanding design ambitions, drive to push the boundaries of design and for their future impact on British design.

Divided into 6 categories: Healthier and Happier, Material World, Social Impact, Living in the city, Rethinking reality and Everyday living it is wonderful to see many of the designers I have profiled on this blog or on Unique Style Platform or my brilliant students!

Ofcourse the most interesting section is Material World where the brilliant Marlene Huissoud with her From Insects project utilising propolis from bees is nominaated as well as Lucy Libotte who explores dust as a material for glazing ceramics who are both graduates from Materials Futures at CSM, whilst Wael Saeiby who re works plastic bags into beautiful vases and Effie Koukia with her edible ink for safe graffiti and printing push the boundaries of materiality.

Also in this category is a project that I hadn't seen before from Fernando Laposse Madero who is a material alchemist who experiments with sugar to resemble glass. Creating cocktail glasses, the drinks become sweeter as time passes.

Good luck to them all




Moon Light

3rd February 2015

Continuing to explore an alchemic approach to materiality that started with her unproven chair project in collaboration with James Shaw, Marjan van Aubel's latest project the Moon Light is made from a self created technique of foam porcelain which is lightweight and expands and rises in the kiln like bread, upto 300% in size.

Making use of its translucency, she has designed it into a light that softly diffuses light through the foam surface which resembles the surface of the moon.

About


I use this blog as a notebook of inspirations – I post things I see and like and thoughts of mine. I don't revolve around a singular topic and neither does this blog. Everything and anything is relevant


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Algae/Bacteria 1: Material of the Month

Something about Form

Anti Materials

Design Council Ones to Watch

Moon Light



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places I go for inspiration


Next Nature
Designindaba
Blueprint
WIDN
Dailytonic
designboom
Textile Futures Research Group
Triangulation
materials library
TodayandTomorrow
highlowtech
thecoolhunter
Kithkin
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Notcot
Core77
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Seed
Michael Burton
edhv
Mocoloco
Sightunseen
Planet Mag